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Theodore Rogers, left, a mail handler equipment operator at the Cardiss Collins Processing and Distribution Center who recently marked 65 years of federal service, stands with Distribution Operations Manager Steve Johnson.

Celebrating Mr. Rogers

Employee marks 65 years of federal service

Dec. 9 at 10:57 a.m.

Theodore Rogers, left, a mail handler equipment operator at the Cardiss Collins Processing and Distribution Center who recently marked 65 years of federal service, stands with Distribution Operations Manager Steve Johnson.

Theodore Rogers is looking forward to what will probably be his last holiday season at the Cardiss Collins Processing and Distribution Center in Chicago.

“It’s just wonderful and nice what we do at the Postal Service for folks to celebrate Christmas,” said Rogers, who plans to retire next year.

Along with getting into the holiday spirit, the mail handler equipment operator and Korean War veteran has marked a rare milestone: 65 years of federal service.

Chicago District recognized Rogers’ achievement last month during a Veterans Day ceremony honoring employees who have served in the military.

The event was attended by the many friends and colleagues that Rogers has gotten to know during the past six decades.

“I have known him a long time — since I started. He is very dedicated and dependable and always there,” said Steve Johnson, distribution operations manager.

Rogers began his postal career in November 1954, soon after being discharged at the end of the Korean War.

He is one of several employees who’ve marked six decades or more of service in recent years, including a Maryland mail processing clerk and a trio of Los Angeles workers.

Today’s postal workforce is far more diverse than it was when he began his career, Rogers said.

“It was all men back then. You didn’t see any women,” he said.

While USPS has changed significantly over the years, Rogers’ advice for enjoying a long, successful career with the organization remains unchanged.

“Do your job and help others,” he said. “If you see something that needs to be done, do it. Don’t say, ‘It’s not my job.’ Everything is your job.”

 

 

 

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